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The adult education committee is pleased to be offering a great line up of AWEsome interesting and meaningful Zoom sessions to enhance our DAYS of AWE, between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. We have a Zoom-ful array of speakers including as you can see below. Each session will be interactive to the extent possible.

For information on Adult Education Programs on the afternoon of Yom Kippur, click HERE

Links to Zoom programs will be sent to everyone who has registered for the High Holiday livestream services and programming.


 
JEWS DOING GOOD: HOW A GROUP OF AMERICAN JEWS LED THE US GOVERNMENT TO TRANSFORM NATIVE AMERICAN RIGHTS
 
with David S. Koffman
Monday September 21, 7:30 pm on Zoom
 
One of the core themes of the yamim noraim (Days of Awe) is expressed in the prophet’s watchword “this is the fast I desire: to unlock fetters of wickedness” (Isaiah 58:6). Drawing from extensive archival research, this talk explores the inspiring work of a cadre of mid-20th century Jewish justice-seeking lawyers, civil servants and intellectuals who turned centuries-long anti-Indian policy on its head and created the most progressive pro-Native policy the U.S. had ever known. 
 
David S. Koffman is the J. Richard Shiff Chair for the Study of Canadian Jewry, and an associate professor in the Department of History at York University, where he teaches courses on Canadian Jewish history, religion in American life, the meanings of money, genealogy as history, modern antisemitism, and religion & capitalism. His first monograph, The Jews’ Indian: Colonialism, Pluralism, and Belonging in America (Rutgers University Press, 2019), explores the American Jewish encounter with Native America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His newest book project, an edited volume entitled, No Better Home?: Jews, Canada, and the Sense of Belonging, will be published by the University of Toronto Press this fall. He serves as the editor-in-chief of the journal Canadian Jewish Studies / Études juives canadiennes.
 

 
REFLECTIONS ON RENEWAL:  PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE
 
with Ruth Rohn
Tuesday, September 22 at 7:30 pm on Zoom
 
In this session, we will engage with selected biblical, classical liturgical and contemporary texts. Through close reading and discussion, we will find new meaning, deepen our understanding and enrich our experience of the Days of Awe.
Ruth Rohn is an educator who has worked with children, adolescents and adults. A longtime member of the Narayever, Ruth has been active as prayer leader, leyner  and teacher. Ruth is fluent in Hebrew and conversant with classical Hebrew texts. She is currently the Tefillah Coach at our shul.
 
 
 
 
 

 
IS GUILT A NECESSARY PART OF THE TESHUVA PROCESS?
with Sofia Freudenstein
Wednesday, September 23 at 12:00 pm on Zoom
 
In modern contexts, religion is usually frowned upon as a mechanism that introduces guilt and feeling bad about oneself. Is this what the process of Teshuva (or Atonement) demands of us, and how is that supposed to make us feel during the High Holiday season? Through the texts of philosopher Friedrech Nietzsche and Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik, we will explore the nature of teshuva and see what it can mean to become a better self, guilt-free.
 
Sofia Freudenstein is in her fourth and final year of undergraduate studies at the University of Toronto, double majoring in Jewish Studies and Philosophy.  She is a Hillel International Student Cabinet Member, involved in interfaith activities on campus, part of a Clinical Pastoral Education unit, and co-program coordinator for Women's Beit Midrash.  In her (minimal) spare time, she enjoys being outside, reading, listening to music, and analyzing religious tropes in television shows.
 

 
EXISTENTIAL ANGST IN THE TIME OF A PLAGUE - HOW TO USE AN EXISTENTIAL CRISIS TO DEEPEN CONNECTION WITH SELF, COMMUNITY AND CULTURE
with Sarah Colman
Wednesday, September 23 at 7:30 pm on Zoom
 
This talk will incorporate Jewish and non-Jewish perspectives on managing and using existential distress to increase our connection to ourselves and the world.  Drawing from religious, psychiatric and pop culture sources, this interactive seminar hopes to challenge and support you in reflecting deeply on your own and humanities' place in the world.
Sarah Colman is a geriatric psychiatrist at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, a lay service leader, a shofar blower, and spends much of her mental time on existential issues when not distracted by her husband and kids.

 

 

 


 
SPIRITUAL PREPARATION FOR YOM KIPPUR: GUIDANCE FROM ABRAHAM JOSHUA HESCHEL
with Ben Carniol and Lesley Simpson
Thursday, September 24 at 7:30 pm on Zoom
 
Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel wrote that “in regard the cruelties committed in the name of a free society, some are guilty, while all of us are responsible.” Heschel’s reflections about the problems of suffering and evil, provide us with spiritual guidelines for our Yom Kippur journey into t’shuva, atonement, change and renewal.
 
Ben Carniol was a hidden child in Belgium during the Holocaust, when his parents were murdered by the Nazis. A branch of his family in Ottawa adopted him. Now at Laurier University, he is a social work educator, supporting solidarity with Indigenous people who seek human rights for their communities, and respect for the land.
Lesley Simpson is a write whose PhD research explores paradigms of Jewish memory from performative comedy to memoir and wordless music. Her academic research explores Heschel's observations about the power of music.
 
 
 

 


 
WASTE NOT: A SWOT ANALYSIS
with Tanhum Yoreh
Friday, September 25, 12:00pm on Zoom
 
Bal tashḥit is a fluid concept that shifts over the course of history between an environmental ethic and a utilitarian principle. This talk will focus on the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats of bal tashḥit as an environmental ethic for today and tomorrow.
Tanhum Yoreh is an Assistant Professor at the School of Environment at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on religion and environment, faith-based environmentalism, faith-based environmental ethics, and religious legal approaches to environmental protection. He is the author of Waste Not: A Jewish Environmental Ethic (2019).
 
 
 
 
Fri, October 23 2020 5 Cheshvan 5781